Post Road Magazine #12

Post Road makes only a small part of its content available on the Web. Purchase the print edition to enjoy the issue contents in full.

Excitable Women, Damaged Men by Robert Boyers - Adam Braver

With a national narrative primed in disconnection, it is no wonder that so many people are in constant search for their identities, going to sleep pure of mind but waking up with bruises that they can’t account for.....more

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling - Susan Perabo

Listen, if you’re looking for a great work of literary fiction, please, please, please go buy a book by Cathy Day or Brad Barkley or Donald Hays. These are fine writers who absolutely deserve your support. But I insist you also borrow a copy of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince from your nephew, and read it at once. Here’s why: ...

John Dollar and Eveless Eden by Marianne Wiggins - Susan Choi

I first read Marianne Wiggins some time in 1992 or 1993. It was her novel John Dollar, not long after it was issued in paperback, and it was an experience from which I emerged awed and harrowed and horrified and physically shaken, as if it was me and not the title character who’d been smashed and crippled and then eaten in demonic little bites by a pair of starving school girls.....more

Lawrence Weschler’s Vermeer in Bosnia - Rachel Kadish

One night last spring, midway through an until-then-uneventful pregnancy, I was awakened by overwhelming abdominal pain.....

Selected Letters of Dawn Powell 1913–1965, edited by Tim Page - Elissa Schappell

Perhaps you are feeling sorry for yourself? Maybe you lost your guy, can’t make rent, or are hungover? Maybe you fear you can’t write anymore, are being dogged by collection agencies, or not getting the respect you deserve from those who bestow the laurels in the literary community?....more

The Works of Robert Dean Frisbie - Anthony Weller

Largely forgotten sixty years after his death, his books rarely in print, Robert Dean Frisbie—a tall, humorous, skinny American who, just after the end of World War I, settled in the farthest reaches of the South Seas to write novels—was, in the words of James Michener, “the most graceful, poetic and sensitive writer ever to have reported on the islands.” Frisbie realized a fantasy many men dream about: a tropical vision of island beauty which included local maidens, a large family, solitude to write in, and surviving a hurricane. It meant tragedy, too, for after the death of Frisbie's beloved Polynesian wife Nga, as a colleague wrote, “Paradise found his weakness and had no mercy.” ...

“The Ordinary Son” by Ron Carlson - Lisa Selin Davis

When I first read Ron Carlson’s short story “The Ordinary Son,” it was as if an insect had buzzed by me so quickly that I had no time to identify it, but I could feel the presence of its absence. You know what I mean. I could hardly see how that particular arrangement of words—that appeared to be clever and whimsical and kind of surfacy, if that makes sense—could cause such a sharp sensation of heartache. ...

“The Bound Man,” from Ilse Aichinger’s The Bound Man - Naama Goldstein

Ilse Aichinger was born in Austria, Jewish on her mother’s side, and suffered under the power-madness of Nazism. Her collection of stories, The Bound Man, concerns the human dialogue with our ultimate powerlessness....

War and Peace as Hypertext - Mary Grimm

My reading of War and Peace was like this: I began it quite young, maybe at eleven. My parents had a handsomely bound copy in their bookcase with the little doors. I'm pretty sure that they’d never read it; not positive, but pretty sure.....

Blue Angel by Francine Prose - Greg Williams

Although I admire and learn from the work of many of my predecessors and contemporaries, I rarely recommend books. Doing so can seem prescriptive. What’s liquor to me might be cough syrup to you. But as several of my irritated friends can attest, I’ve been all too glad lately to abandon reticence on behalf of Francine Prose’s Blue Angel, which, in a regrettable lapse, I didn’t get around to reading until four years after its publication....

Birds of America by Mary McCarthy - Perri Klass

This is certainly not a novel by an obscure writer; instead, it is an almost completely unknown novel by a well-known writer. Birds of America is a novel that no one has read—and I know this because I keep mentioning it to people, and I keep mentioning it to people because this is a surpassingly interesting novel of ideas....

Behind the Attic Wall by Sylvia Cassedy - Andrea Seigel

In elementary school, the number one prerequisite for my reading material was that there be a ghost on the cover. If the ghost was on the cover of a Nancy Drew book then I knew it would not end up being a ghost, but a deceitful young (and greedy) woman playing a ghost. ....

Cross Creek by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings - JoeAnn Hart

Imagine, for a moment, the forest floor coupling of Henry David Thoreau and Xena, Warrior Princess, then contemplate the child that would spring from that encounter, and there you would have the wild, yet sensitive, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. In the 1930s and 40s, Rawlings spent steamy Florida nights hunting frogs with flashlights and cold nights lighting frost fires in the orange grove....

 

 

 Copyright © 2016 | Post Road Magazine | All Rights Reserved